Tag Archives: writer’s block

NaNo Lessons 2018 (So Far) | House Blog

1. Writing every day is good. I’ve been doing a lot of editing lately, so I felt a bit rusty jumping back into novel writing. Pushing myself to write every day is helping get me back in the groove, and I’m finding that I’m more focused on the story as a whole and quicker at solving issues. Even if you can’t write every day, it’s helpful to try to write as often as you can. Just like swimming, if you don’t practice, your skills can get rusty (and you won’t be able to do those cool jump dives from the side of the pool like you used to).

2. It doesn’t matter what you write – WRITE. Some purists may consider it cheating to include writing that isn’t within your novel, but I think that as long as you’re getting words down, it can count. The novel I’m writing is about characters putting on a play, so not only am I writing the novel, but also the play within (I searched for a version online but couldn’t find one). Whenever I hit a brick wall on the novel, I’ll turn around and write the play, so I can stay productive instead of staring at my screen blankly. Sometimes, if I get stuck on both, I’ll do word-sprints to help outline the plot or work through a problem. While these things aren’t necessarily helping the novel’s word-count, it’s still writing and it’s still helpful.

3. Seriously – JUST WRITE. It was only day 2 in NaNo when I decided to pause and write a Kit Sora fiction. Sometimes I get stuck in a project and don’t know where to go next, so I need something else to think about, like an amuse-bouche for my brain. It keeps me writing, and there are so many other things out there to write (like Flying Stories). As a bonus, sometimes while I’m writing something else, my novel will notice that my attention’s elsewhere and get jealous. ‘Remember me? You should get back to me! Here are tons of ideas!

4. Don’t get discouraged if what you write isn’t perfect. This novel is already showing signs of being a good Zero Draft instead of a good First Draft. I’ve got some great scenes and character development, but it’ll need a lot of tightening up. However, instead of going back and trying to make it perfect, I’m writing notes to my future self of what’s needed, before moving on. I won’t finish this novel if I worry about every single word I’ve written, but I will if I keep going forward. As Socrates once said*, It’s better to have a draft that needs work than no draft at all.

5. It’s okay to hold back and wait for inspiration. I find it easier to write when I know what’s coming next or what I want to say. At one point I knew that I wanted to describe a show that was going on, but I didn’t want to write it from my main character’s point of view. So I held off and moved to the next chapter instead of forcing myself to write something I didn’t want to write. Then, that night, I was thinking about the story and I realized exactly who’s point of view I could use. The next day I started writing and SUCCESS! The words came easily and quickly, and the scene was finished in no time.

6. …Just don’t wait too long! Remember that you shouldn’t go too many days without writing. If your inspiration for the next scene isn’t coming along, think of a scene that you want to write and move on to that. If I’m struggling to write something, usually it’s because there’s something off about it. I’ll try to change it, mix it up, or think about it another way. Or cut it out altogether and write something else.

7. There’s still time. November ain’t over yet! Even if you don’t make it to 50,000 words, if you’ve been even the least bit productive, it’s been worth it. And when November ends, it doesn’t mean that you have to stop. Keep on writing! Words forever! Huzzah!

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*Socrates totally did not say that.

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Write Like No One’s Reading | Brad Dunne’s Blog

This weekend I will be launching my debut novel, After Dark Vapours. It’s obviously a very exciting time for me; publishing a book has been a dream for me ever since I was a little kid reading Goosebumps. Likewise, I’ve been lucky to have experienced an outpouring of support and enthusiasm from friends and family. Perhaps the most common refrain I hear, especially from bookish friends, is that they too have always wanted to write a book. If you’re reading this and also feel the same, believe me when I tell you that if I can do it, you can do it. So, with that in mind, I’d like to give you all some advice that I wish someone gave me when I started writing:

Write like no one is reading. Continue reading Write Like No One’s Reading | Brad Dunne’s Blog

Surprise! More Writer’s Block Panel Updates! | Avalon Expo | 48 Hour Writing Marathon

Surprise! We said we were done with the Avalon Expo Writer’s Block announcements, but we had one left! The winner of the 48-Hour Novel-Writing Marathon that took place in late June will be announced a week from today, Friday August 25 2017, during the 6:00pm-8:00pm – Author Social event!

Ellen Curtis, Matthew LeDrew, Stacey Oakley, Katie Little, AJ Ryan, Heather Reilly, Amanda Labonte

Which of our participants will win the first ever 48-Hour Writing Marathon? Someone has to, and we’ll find out who in seven short days! Winners receive: bragging rights! A shiny seal to put on the cover of their book!  fast-tracked manuscript evaluation once their work is complete! Someone has to win, which will it be? 🙂

Lit Wars: Tolkien v. King! Reilly v. Curtis!

The main event! The one we’ve been teasing since we started announcing panels for the Avalon Expo Writer’s Block is finally here: Lit Wars: Tolkien v. King! 6:00-6:50pm Saturday August 26 at MILE ONE Avalon Expo!

Lit Wars will be an hour-long debate to decide, once and for all, which epic fantasy is better: Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings or King’s The Dark Tower. Teams of two will head off against one another to defend their respective kingdom and be crowned: the Lit Warrior!

For team Tolkien: Dr. Christopher Lockett, an associate professor of English at Memorial University of Newfoundland. Though his main area of specialization is twentieth century American literature, his enthusiasms (academic and otherwise) range widely into film and television, fantasy, cultural studies, and the ongoing definitions of humanism
And: Ellen Curtis, the editor of Fantasy from the Rock who has been a prolific fantasy author since the age of fifteen and currently writes for the Infinity series, Newfoundland Quarterly Online, and is a member of the WANL Board as Youth Representative.

For team King: Matthew LeDrew, the author of over a dozen books, including Questing the Dark Tower: An essay examining the concept of Stephen King’s Dark Tower as it applies to Derrida’s theory of the Pharmakon.
And: Heather Reilly, author of the Binding of the Almatraek series of YA fantasy novels, and recipient of the Noble Artist’s Author of the Month award for February 2015.

Moderated by Mike Connors of NTV! Watch as this Lit Nerds engage in Lit Warfare and… let’s be honest, it’s Matt and Heather against Ellen and a MUN Prof. You’re coming to watch Matthew get powned… in the nerd battle that will last from the time of Middle Earth until the crumbling of the Dark Tower itself!! Be there!!


Continue reading Lit Wars: Tolkien v. King! Reilly v. Curtis!

Jacobi Street launch! | The Writer’s Block | Avalon Expo

webAs we announced yesterday, reviews have been coming in for Jacobi Street and it looks like it’s set to be one of our most ambitious novels yet: a single book story (which we’ve never done before!) that brings the author back to his horror-roots. So of course we’re going to be launching it at Avalon Expo during the Writer’s Block, from 1:00-1:50PM on Friday, August 25, 2017! The event will actually kick off the whole Writer’s Block and be first first time the novel will actually be on sale!

This will arguably be the darkest story from the Engen universe but even after ten years of writing LeDrew is still able to paint a horrifying tale with his writing.” — Paul Carberry, Zombies on the Rock

Continue reading Jacobi Street launch! | The Writer’s Block | Avalon Expo