Tag Archives: Dunne Blog

‘Pulp Science-Fiction from the Rock’ becomes Amazon Bestseller!

Pulp Science Fiction from the RockPulp Science-Fiction from the Rock, the sixth volume in the modern From the Rock series, hit #1 Bestseller on March 31, 2020 at 1:14 PM Newfoundland Standard Time.

The eBook is being released ahead of schedule due to shifts in schedule surrounding COVID-19. Purchasers will have it delivered on April 3, 2020.

It reached #1 in the category of ‘Science Fiction Short Stories (Books). As of this writing it has held that #1 spot for nearly 24 hours, and topped out at #522 on the overall paid Amazon ca charts.

A century ago, pulp magazines brought the fresh ideas of science-fiction and exploration to the masses with its rough, inexpensive format, and lit the imaginations of a generation on fire. Those inspired became the greatest storytellers of their time, producing stories that would shock, awe, and inspire. That legacy of the new, the different, and the strange lives on today in the minds and pens of genre writers all over the world.

Pulp Science-Fiction from the Rock seeks to honour that legacy with twenty-two short stories highlighting the best of the modern interpretations of Pulp Science-Fiction, from minds like Ali House (The Segment Delta Archives), Jon Dobbin (The Starving), and Sherry D. Ramsey (Beyond the Sentinel Stars)! With introduction from sci-fi legend Kenneth Tam!

Engen Books would like to congratulate editors Ellen Curtis, & Erin Vance on this achievement, and thank its fans and peers who helps make this possible. We also extend gratitude an congratulations to authors and contributors: Peter Foote, Ali House, Matthew Daniels, Nicole Little, Sherry D. Ramsey, Jeff Slade, Chantal Boudreau, Shannon Green, Jennifer Shelby, Jon Dobbin, Melissa Bishop, Brad Dunne, Corinne Lewandowski, JRH Lawless, Lisa Daly, Andrew Pike, Julie Aubut Gaudet, Daniel Windeler, Alissa Hickox, Andrew McDonald, CS Woodburn and Steve Power!

Brad Dunne, author of ‘After Dark Vapours’ announced as writing for ‘Pulp from the Rock’!

After Dark Vapours Brad DunneEngen Books is proud to announce that Brad Dunne, author of the 2018 novel After Dark Vapours, will writing for the 2020 anthology collection Pulp Sci-Fi from the Rock with his tale ‘The Pale Horse.’

Brad Dunne is a freelance writer and editor from St. John’s, Newfoundland. He began his writing career as an intern at The Walrus magazine and has published journalism and essays in publications such as Maisonneuve, The Canadian Encyclopedia, and Herizons. His short fiction has been featured in In/Words, Acta Victoriana, and The Cuffer Anthology. His debut novel, After Dark Vapours, was released in October 2018 to great critical response, mixing literary sensibilities with genre storytelling.

His second novel, The Gut, is expected in September 2020 from Engen Books. Continue reading Brad Dunne, author of ‘After Dark Vapours’ announced as writing for ‘Pulp from the Rock’!

Looking Ahead: Engen 2020

2019 was an amazing year with a plethora of new titles from Newfoundland’s fastest growing publisher, culminating in the release of our first Young Readers book, The Last Tree. It’s been an incredible year, but we’re here to let you know: 2020 is going to be even crazier.

We have a metric ton of titles coming out, a great deal of which we can’t even tell you about yet. But there are 15 that we can tell you about, and they’re gonna be nuts.

Sarah Thompson The Love of SummerFor the Love of Summer
Author: Sarah Thompson
Genre: LGBTQ+ Romance
Our first book of 2020 is a bold new romance from Sarah Thompson, following Summer and her journey through young adulthood to find herself, and realize that the person she’s been searching for has been her best friend all along. Check it out in January 2020! Continue reading Looking Ahead: Engen 2020

Layered Snake: What Writers Can Learn from Metal Gear Solid

Hideo Kojima, the creative force behind the Metal Gear Solid series and, most recently, Death Stranding, is one the gaming industry’s great auteurs. With each entry in the MGS series, he pushed the envelope with regards to how a video game can tell a story. In this blog post I’m going to talk about some strategies writers can learn from Kojima and MGS.

There’s a lot to say about MGS and the many themes and ideas Kojima manages to touch on. Stuff like post-humanism, censorship, war, individualism, and gaming itself, which barely scratching the surface. What I want to discuss in this post is the series’ tone. Kojima manages to cast a wide net with his storytelling because he’s a master of layering concepts.

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Everyone loves Kojima

When Metal Gear Solid starts, it feels like you’re playing a Tom Clancy-style techno thriller, which was very popular at the time. (However, MGS is more stealth-focused than, say, Rainbow Six, etc.) There’s a high emphasis on verisimilitude. Playing as Solid Snake, the game’s protagonist, you must sneak around enemies and use various tools and weapons. As the story develops, you learn about a conspiracy to develop nuclear weapons, post-Cold War tensions. Yadda yadda yadda. So far, pretty conventional.

Then things start to get weird. You encounter a cyborg ninja who may be a long dead former comrade. And then you battle Psycho Mantis, a master of telekinesis and telepathy. The boss fight is pretty legendary in gaming. In a fourth wall-breaking maneuver, you have to change your controller’s ports so Mantis can’t anticipate your moves. I, and most others, had never seen such a post-modern design in a video game before.

It gets wackier from there. There’s a conspiracy about cloning, a sniper battle involving wolves, a Gatling gun-wielding shaman. It’s pretty awesome. I highly recommend playing it or at least watching a playthrough.

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Mantis could read your memory card and comment on the games you’ve played, how much you save progress, etc

What sets MGS apart from its peers is how Kojima manages to bring in melodramatic anime influences couched in a realist setting. This is what I mean by layering. MGS probably would’ve been modestly successful by just being a military stealth game. What elevates it into becoming a classic is how Kojima brings in these other influences. What amazes me is how seamlessly Kojima transitions from one style to another. Then, by opening up the story to these different influences, Kojima is able to explore more ideas and themes.

I first learned about the concept of layering from Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert (yes, I know). He talks about when he first created the cartoon he recognized that he was a good, but not great, artist; he knew a fair bit about business, having worked in an office; and he had a pretty good sense of humour. He wasn’t great at any one of these things in particular, but when he layered them he was able to achieve great success.

Layering can therefore be a powerful tool for writers, especially for those who don’t want to write purely in one genre or style. It’s also a great way to combine genres in new and unexpected ways.  In his Stanford commencement speech, Steve Jobs famously said “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.” That’s why I find Kojima so inspiring. He shows that you can connect the dots, no matter how disparate they seem.

 

 

Unholy Trinity: Alien and the Three Stages of Fear

It’s the fortieth anniversary of the release of Alien. In its honour, I’d like to try and breakdown why it’s arguably the most effective horror movie ever movie. Much like how the xenomorph has different evolutionary forms, so too does horror

In the introduction to his short story collection Maps in a Mirror, Orson Scott Card identifies three stages of fear: 1) Dread 2) Terror and 3) Horror. Continue reading Unholy Trinity: Alien and the Three Stages of Fear

Plotters vs Pantsers: Prior Planning Prevents Proper Piss-offs

I liked the Game of Thrones finale. Fight me.

Much like the last episode of Lost, it couldn’t absolve all the sins of the final season(s), but the episode in itself was satisfying. In my last post, I was critical of the last two seasons of Game of Thrones, arguing that the writers were prioritizing spectacle over storytelling. And now, looking back over how it all went down, it’s really perplexing to me that they didn’t use all this time to better set the ground for Dany’s heel turn.

In a post that’s gone viral, Daniel Silvermint suggests that the series has moved away from the “pantser” ethos of GRRM towards the “plotter” approach of showrunners D&D. Silvermint does a great breakdown of what these terms mean, so I suggest reading it, but I’ll do a brief summary for you: “plotters” are writers who list out the major plot points of a story before they start fleshing it out; whereas “pantsers” discover the story as they write it, they fly by the seat of their pants. Tolkien is often referred to as the ultimate plotter because he designed the maps, languages, and lore of Middle Earth before writing LOTR. Conversely, GRRM is the ultimate pantser because he claims that he loses interest in a story once he learns the ending. Continue reading Plotters vs Pantsers: Prior Planning Prevents Proper Piss-offs

Dracarys! Spectacle vs Storytelling

Another episode of Game of Thrones and another cry of indignation from fans. This seems to have become the norm with this season, the cracks having started to form in the one previous. Coincidentally, these are the seasons where the showrunners have truly had to go on without source material; season six was still dealing with the consequences of five/Dance with Dragons. And while I think they’ve done an excellent job adapting Martin’s book–I’d argue the show has mostly been superior to the books–they are now exposed. A series that was once full of clever and unexpected upheavals of tropes has now become a well-crafted but conventional spectacle. Continue reading Dracarys! Spectacle vs Storytelling