Winner: “Unicorn” by Michelle Churchill | Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest

After much deliberation, Engen Books is proud to announce the winner of the August 18 2018 Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest: Michelle Churchill with her story, Unicorn!

A Newfoundlander who was raised in Nova Scotia but returned, Churchill is the mother of two incredible children. She made her publishing debut in Chillers from the Rock with her chilling tale: Leopold’s Cherubs Princes.
Continue reading Winner: “Unicorn” by Michelle Churchill | Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest

Winner: “One Up, One Down” by Sara Burke | Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest

matchstick3After much deliberation, Engen Books is proud to announce the winner of the August 15 2018 Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest: Sara Burke with her story, One Up, One Down!

Burke is a new author to the St. John’s writing scene. As of this month she is the first person to win the Kit Sora Flash Fiction contest twice.

There were two judges for this month of the contest:


Matthew LeDrew has written eighteen novels for Engen Books, Black Womb, Transformations in Pain, Smoke and Mirrors, Roulette, Ghosts of the Past, Ignorance is Bliss, Becoming, Inner Child, Gang War, Chains, The Long Road, Cinders, Sinister Intent, Faith, Jacobi Street, Infinity, The Tourniquet Reprisal and Exodus of Angels. Continue reading Winner: “One Up, One Down” by Sara Burke | Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest

“Frigid” by Catherine Rector | Short Story Winner

It wasn’t supposed to end this way.

I threw my fist against the ice again, willing it to crack underneath my bloodied knuckles. How could anything be so thick? She was right there. I had to reach her. Then I could save her. I could tell her.

But the ice didn’t budge.

I screamed, falling to my elbows above her. She hadn’t moved in so long. Her lips were nearly violet. Her eyes, which had always been alight with life, were nothing but barren mirrors, reflecting my grief back at me. Continue reading “Frigid” by Catherine Rector | Short Story Winner

Winner: “Frigid” by Catherine Rector | Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest

After much deliberation, Engen Books is proud to announce the winner of the July 15 2018 Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest: Catherine Rector with her story, Frigid!

Catherine Rector was born in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, and grew up in rural Nova Scotia. Currently residing in her nerd cave in Belgium, she spends most of her time on single player adventures like reading, gaming and writing. Continue reading Winner: “Frigid” by Catherine Rector | Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest

Hail, Paimon! Perspective in Hereditary

One of my favourite podcasts at the moment is Show me the Meaning, which does deep dives into the themes of popular movies. (It was a big influence for my podcast Deconstruction Junction.) Even when I disagree with them, I still find lots to think about. Recently they were discussing Hereditary, a pretty awesome but polarizing horror movie. They mostly took issue with a pivotal moment in the film where the plot shifts from psychological horror to supernatural. I want to zero in on this moment because it reveals a lot about perspective and how the viewer treats the camera as an “objective” point of view.

 

(Before I continue I’m gonna make a spoiler alert here. If you haven’t seen Hereditary then I strongly suggest watching it before reading this because I’m gonna be discussing some plot details, especially w/r/t the climax and conclusion. You’ve been warned!) Continue reading Hail, Paimon! Perspective in Hereditary

The Weird Habits of Writers | House Blog

And here we see the elusive ‘Writer’ in its natural habitat… Be careful – we don’t want to scare it off…

 

Speaking for myself, I tend to do some weird things when I write. Usually I do this in the safety of my own home, where other people can’t witness these oddities, but sometimes the weird cannot be contained and spills out into the rest of the world…

 

As we can see, sometimes the writer’s face will suddenly contort into strange expressions, as if warning unseen enemies not to get too close…

When I’m writing a scene between two people, I’ll often find myself trapped in dialogue, so I’ll toss in some descriptions to break it up a little. If I want to describe how someone’s face looks, it’s easiest for me to make the face I want and go from there. If a character’s conflicted, I’ll pretend I feel that way and then I’ll notice how my eyebrows come together and the left corner of my mouth tightens. If you ever see me making weird faces for no reason, it’s probably because I’m working on a story.

 

If we get a little closer we can hear the writer talking to itself, repeating words over and over, as if invoking an ancient spirit…

I like my dialogue to sound natural (well, as natural as something entirely scripted can sound), so I’ll say the lines to myself – sometimes acting out entire scenes. If a line’s not working, I’ll try saying it a few times to figure out what’s not working. Do I need to find a better word? Rearrange the sentence order? Start from scratch…? What sounds better?

 

Sometimes, the writer will sit still for hours, not moving in the slightest. We suspect that this is some kind of strange meditation, and yet they do not seem very relaxed…

Yeah, I’ve been there. Staring at the screen or page in front of me, willing words to suddenly appear – afraid that if you move you might scare the words away. I’ve found this to be one of the worst ways for me to get over writer’s block, and yet I cannot stop doing it. I did it at least 5 times while I was writing this blog post…

 

Here we see the strange, awkward dance of the writer. Although there are no other people around, notice as they move about in strange ways, dancing to music that only they can hear…

Confession time: I like to act out fight scenes. It gives me a better idea of what’s going on and how the characters are moving, plus I get a better idea of tension and momentum and pacing. Also, it’s really fun to act out fight scenes.

 

I’m sure there are many other odd habits I’ve failed to mention, but I’ve got to go stare at my computer screen for a few hours and will some words to appear.

Do you have any strange writing habits you’d like to share? Any habits here seem familiar to you?

And remember, if someone sees you doing something strange and confusion clouds their eyes, just say “I’m a writer” and that should be explanation enough.